Configr.io v0.1 Update

It’s a little weird to be actively working on a project and not be sure of the userbase, but I figured I should make at least a blog post about the updates I’ve been working on for my super simple service Configr.io!

I’m happy to announce the release of a bunch of updates to Configr.io that were requested/sorely needed!

During the days since configr.io launched, I’ve been working to add features, and fix bugs that were present, and those efforts have culminated in Confgir.io v.0.1!

What’s changed

  • Added viewing and editing of configs right from the site
  • Enabled bi-hourly full backups
  • Added a notice to more clearly let users know that comments (while logged in) are not anonymous
  • Added a link to the configr blog to the top menu

Upcoming

  • UI Redesign – I’m not a big fan of how it looks now at all, and have been wanting to redesign it for a while, I will try and get to this during the upcoming weeks

Adding these changes really gave me a chance to dive in to and get the feel for the development process with nodejs. Making a proper local test bed as well as managing the test database, code, and packages was really easy to do. While I did encounter some self-induced issues when updating the version of the code that was on the server (and some files still don’t reflect the 0.0->0.1 version change), overall the process was very smoothe, much smoother than when I have used various other frameworks (flask, yii, rails).

Also, the nodejs server seems to be handling traffic really well — forever.js reports that the site was up for something like 10 days straight, which might be a testament to how LITTLE traffic I am getting, but I generally have not had to worry about the server going down, which is fantastic.

Adding the inline code editor gave me a chance to use CodeMirror , possibly one of the coolest projects ever. It is utilized by a lot of online-coding environments and it is an absolute joy to use and has worked great for me, though at points it was a little rough around the edges when lumped in with bootstrap and knockoutjs. Rather than cobbling together my own textarea-based implementation, I could use the CodeMirror project’s well-done inline code editing features, which was great. Surely, this must be what modular code nirvana feels like.

As always, if you have some improvements or things that you’d like to see implemented, feel free to send an email, contact through the site, or leave a comment here, and I will try and get it in for the next release!